The Ethical Fashion Report

Right as I’m about to hand in my DA the ethical fashion report for 2021 got dropped, a perfect way to close l.w.S- the sustainable.

What is the ethical Fashion report?

The fashion report is a large PDF that can be sent to your inbox for free, tabbing through it I can quickly grasp the main concepts that make up the report. Overall, it is a grading report on brands across the world. The grading is from A+ to F, taking in the “three big challenges – modern slavery, climate change and COVID-19” (2021 Baptist World). It also compares the report from previous years to show where improvement has been made and where it is lacking. The website also provides a space to type in your favourite brands to see what rating they get.

https://baptistworldaid.org.au/resources/ethical-fashion-guide/?append_order_id=504875&key=wc_order_KHSO6E0yabINr

the insight into 2021

  • 80 billion items have been bought across the world annually.
  • Over 50 million people work in the industry.
  • 420 Brands were assessed, 20.5% ranked in A+ and A, 56% ranked in B and C and 23.5% ranked in at D and F.
  • Fashion industry is TOP 5 in most exposed to MODERN SLAVERY RISK.
  • The industry also contributes to 10% of global greenhouse gasses.

the COMPARISON to PREVIOUS years

– Only four companies achieved A+, them being; Etiko, Joyya, Mighty Good Basics and Outland Denim.

The Modern Slavery challenge

  • “Migrant workers are particularly vulnerable to forced labour because they are outside of the protections of their home company.”
  • The industry and companies involved have a level or responsibility, and in many cases higher levels of monitoring are put in place to keep up fair work.
  • But certain cases in which the “governments may be complicit in human rights abuses, boycotts may be the only option to mitigate modern slavery risk.”
  • 37 companies signed the Uzbek Cotton Pledge (commiting to the end of forced labour in the cotton section in Uzbekistan.
  • 22 companies have signed the Turkmen Cotton Pledge (commiting to the end of forced labour in the cotton section in Turkmenistan.)
  • China is still in very early days, but progress is slowly being made.
  • Xinjang is “the largest cotton producing region in China” making it difficult to verify if it is free from forced labour .

The climate challenge

  • 70% of the fashion industry’s emissions stem from the supply chain and the other 30% is related to the consumer, retail and end-of-life phases.
  • If the fashion industry doesn’t take a significant reduction in emissions, the greenhouse gases are predicted to rise from 2.1 billion tones a year (2018) to 2.7 billion tones a year (2030).
– Introduction of circular fashion, which is the use of existing resources to create rather than extracting from the earth.
  • Overproduction and over consumption (fast fashion) is how businesses model there sales, but half of the companies surveyed are looking at re-evalutating and this is worth it! If the whole industry minimised by 10% the emissions produced could be reduced by 158 million tonnes by 2030.

Some major concerns

  • Only four companies could demonstrate paying a living wage to 100% of there workers in 2021, but in 2013 it was just two companies. Almost 10 years and 2 more companies joined the team!
  • Only 29% of companies have pathways in place to target decarbonisation.

What can you do?

  • Take the quiz at http://www.myshoppingtype.com.au to see where you are at.
  • Take interest in reports, articles and blogs about the ethical consumption.
  • Make small switches to brands that score well or even better, BUY SECOND HAND!
  • Start a conversation!
I took the quiz and here were my results. The quiz only took five minutes are gave me a brief over view of my results, it also told me where to go from here. I also ran the brands I often buy from in the brand finder, unfortunately most of the brands I shop from weren’t ranked including; Tree of Life, Ghanda and Ottway the Label.

I hope this summary of the report made it easier to see the overview, and the impacts of our consumption. Making a statement looks better when its not just about the design.

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